Home > Uncategorized > I don’t understand

I don’t understand

June 30th, 2007
Marketing Advertising Blog — VuManhThang.Com

I do not understand how there can be full communion between churches like the ELCA that does not endorse homosexual marriages and those that do, for instance, the United Church of Christ. Here is a photo of a UCC marriage celebration.

Ucc_gay_marriage_2

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!
Categories: Uncategorized
  1. Christine
    June 30th, 2007 at 15:14 | #1

    It’s not really surprising to me. I attended an ELCA church for several years before I became Roman Catholic. I was spiritually “weaned” on the writings of Luther (often in German, as that is my native tongue).
    It all began to go downhill when the LCA, ALC and AELC merged to form the new Lutheran body that became the ECLA. “Satis est” and “adiaphora” began to be slowly but steadily reinterpreted. First it was the ordination of women. Then the requirements for intercommunion began to be eased to the point where ELCA theologians found a way to justify open communion with the various Reformed bodies that included the UCC.
    In theory the ECLA does not endorse gay marriage but if one looks at individual ELCA congregations, especially a particular one in San Francisco one can pretty clearly discern that that bulwark is soon to fall. When the ECLA established full communion with the Episcopal and UCC churches it almost seemed inevitable.
    It is all so sad. Many congregations of the ELCA once belonged to the LCMS. The WordAlone Network is a body of ELCA Lutherans struggling to return the ELCA to her Biblical and Confessional roots. May the effort bear fruit for Christ’s glory.

  2. July 2nd, 2007 at 08:30 | #2

    It’s not really surprising. The ELCA believes that feelings are real and theology is meaningless. As long as everybody feels good (except for those contemptible conservatives, who don’t count anyway), God is pleased.
    McCain: Sadly, many in the ELCA do think this way, but not yet all, to be sure; but, tragically far, far too many.

  3. July 4th, 2007 at 08:23 | #3

    I think that part of it is how ELCAers define “communion.” I don’t think that the ELCA thinks that you have to agree on stuff to be in “communion” with one another. After all, we are all so diverse.

Comments are closed.