Home > CPH Resources > What’s New in the Third Edition of “Women Pastors?”

What’s New in the Third Edition of “Women Pastors?”

March 8th, 2012
Marketing Advertising Blog — VuManhThang.Com

What’s new in the third edition of Women Pastors? Good question, here are the six new essays in the book, and following this I’ve provided the entire Table of Contents. This book is truly the most extensive treatment of this subject and brings to bear a wide range of authors and arguments against the practice of ordaining women as pastors.

Phoebe: A Role Model for Deaconesses Today by Deaconess Cynthia Lumley
Dr. Cynthia Lumley, associate director of deaconess studies at Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, Indiana, takes up the case of Phoebe, who is mentioned briely in Roma. 16:1-2. Lumley demonstrates how this Chrisian woman served not as a minister of the Word but in a way that reflected the sacrificial character of Jesus Christ in her support of the work of apostolic ministry.

Disciples But Not Teachers: 1 Corinthians 14:33b-38 and 1 Timothy 2:11-15 by Dr. John Kleinig
Dr. John Kleinig, recently retired after a distinguished teaching career as pastor and seminary professor in the Lutheran Church of Australia, examines 1 Cor. 14:33b-28 and 1 Tim. 2:11-15, demonstrating that women are and must be disciples of Jesus but are not to teach in the liturgical assembly.

The Use of Tractate 26 to Promote the Ordination of Women by John Kleinig
In this shorter piece, Dr. Kleinig argues that Philip Melanchthon’s confession that the ministry of the New Testament is not bound to persons, as was the Levititcal priesthood of the Old Testament, does not open th way for the ordination of women [or actively homosexual persons!]. On the contrary, Melanchthon grounds the authority of the office on the institution of Christ in contrast with the purely human authority of the papacy. Teh ordination of women is an act of human authority; it cannot be demonstrated as being instituted by Christ.

The Ordination of Women and the Ecclesiastical Endorsement of Homosexuality: Are They Related? by John T. Pless
John T. Pless, assistant professor of pastoral ministry and missions at Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, Indiana, examines the coherence and parallelism of theological arguments now being offered for the ordination of practicing homosexuals with those arguments that were and are made for the ordination of women.

Giver to Receiver: God’s Design for the Sexes by Adriane Dorr
Adriane Dorr, MAR, managing editor of The Lutheran Witness, examines God’s design for man and woman noting that the differences between male and female are reflected in God’s ordering of the life of both family and church for our blessing.

Vocational Boundaries: The Service of Women within The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod by Kimberly Schave
Deaconess Kimberly Schave applies the doctrine of vocation to the issue of the ordination of women in “vocational boundaries,” lifting up how women are called by God to serve in home, church and world.

 

Complete Table of Contents

Publisher’s Preface
Preface to Third Edition
Preface to First and Second Editions

Section I: Exegetical Studies
The New Testament and the Ordination of Women — Henry P. Hamann

Didaskalos: The Office, Man and Woman in the New Testament — Bertil Gärtner

Phoebe: A Role Model for Deaconesses Today—Cynthia Lumley

Disciples But Not Teachers: 1 Corinthians 14:33b–38 and 1 Timothy 2:11–15 — John W. Kleinig

1 Corinthians 14:33b–38, 1 Timothy 2:11–14, and the Ordination of Women—Peter Kriewaldt

“As in All the Churches of the Saints”: A Text-Critical Study of 1 Corinthians 14:34,35—David W. Bryce

Ordained Proclaimers or Quiet Learners? Women in Worship in Light of 1 Timothy 2—Charles A. Gieschen

The Ordination of Women: A Twentieth-Century Gnostic Heresy?—Louis A. Brighton

Ordered Community: Order and Subordination in the New Testament—John W. Kleinig

The Ordination of Women—Gregory J. Lockwood

Section II: Historical Studies
Women in the History of the Church: Learned and Holy, But Not Pastors—William Weinrich

The Use of Tractate 26 to Promote the Ordination of Women—John W. Kleinig

Liberation Theology in the Leading Ladies of Feminist Theology—Roland Ziegler

Forty Years of Female Pastors in Scandinavia — Fredrik Sidenvall

The Ordination of Women and Ecclesial Endorsement of Homosexuality: Are They Related?—John T. Pless

Section III: Systematic Theology
Twenty-three Theses on the Holy Scriptures, the Woman, and the Office of the Ministry—Bo Giertz

The Ministry and the Ministry of Women—Peter Brunner

The Ordination of Women and the Doctrine of the Holy Trinity—John W. Kleinig

May Women Be Ordained as Pastors?—David P. Scaer

The Office of the Pastor and the Problem of the Ordination of Women Pastors—David P. Scaer

Ordination of Women?—Hermann Sasse

The Women’s Ordination Debate in the Lutheran Church of Australia: An Open Response to the Initial Report of the Commission on Theology and Interchurch Relations—Gregory Lockwood

The Ordination of Women into the Office of the Church—Reinhard Slenczka

The Argument over Women’s Ordination in Lutheranism as a Paradigmatic Conflict of Dogma—Armin Wenz

Giver to Receiver: God’s Design for the Sexes—Adriane Dorr

Section IV: Theology of Ministry
Ministry and Ordination—John W. Kleinig

Gender Considerations on the Pastoral Office: In Light of 1 Corinthians 14:33–36 and 1 Timothy 2:8–14—Robert Schaibley

“It Is Not Given to Women to Teach”: A Lex in Search of a Ratio—William Weinrich

Vocational Boundaries: The Service of Women within The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod—Kimberly Schave

How My Mind Has Changed—Louis A. Smith

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!
Categories: CPH Resources
  1. Brian Whittle
    March 8th, 2012 at 11:24 | #1

    Those new essays look like great additions to the collection! Since I have the Second Edition, though, I do not want to have to purchase the Third Edition just to get them. Any help there?

    • March 8th, 2012 at 11:29 | #2

      Sorry, you will need to buy a copy of the third edition. That’s how the edition cookie crumbles.

  2. Pastor Gary Piepkorn
    March 8th, 2012 at 12:33 | #3

    How about an electronic version?

  3. March 8th, 2012 at 16:56 | #5

    I own the 1st edition but I just purchased the new 3rd edition. HAD TO HAVE IT! Also, there are some former ELCA people in my town (Jamestown, ND) who are not quite ready for the LCMS because of the Women’s Ordination issue. I’ve talked them into getting this book!

  4. Karen Keil
    March 9th, 2012 at 13:03 | #6

    Noticed this chapter:
    Giver to Receiver: God’s Design for the Sexes by Adriane Dorr
    Adriane Dorr, MAR, managing editor of The Lutheran Witness, examines God’s design for man and woman noting that the differences between male and female are reflected in God’s ordering of the life of both family and church for our blessing.

    Now my question: Is a woman sinning in being never married and working in a job/career to support herself? Is she disobeying God’s will for marrying and having children even though very few prospects came along?

    I found it takes all my mind, strength and stamina just looking after myself in living a normal life as possible with a profound hearing loss, leaving little energy left for a husband or children. Any man expecting me to take care of him AND me BOTH without helping me in return would be very disappointed!

    The divorce statistics for hearing men married to deaf women is highest compared to divorce statistics for (1) hearing men to hearing women and (2) deaf men to deaf women (both lowest), and (3) deaf men to hearing women (in the middle). However, I think God’s will may be different for specific individuals without going against his will in general. He might have a different plan in mind for me, too, but still I wonder.

  5. Karen Keil
    March 12th, 2012 at 04:50 | #7

    @Karen Keil
    After much consideration, I wish I could delete my previous comment.

    St. Paul in the New Testament was apparently not married (e.g. 1 Cor 7:8) but it didn’t imply that he wasn’t following God’s will. He wrote (1 Cor 7:17) where each person is to “lead the life that the Lord has assigned to him, and to which God has called him”. Later on, he wrote that he had no command from the Lord regarding women but wrote that women who marry do good and women who don’t marry do good as well, too. He wrote to all “…not to lay any restraint upon you, but to promote good order and to secure your undivided attention to the Lord” (1 Cor 7:35).

    Regarding the book about woman pastors, I am planning to get this to see the latest writings on this subject. I have read articles in the past both pro and con on woman pastors and agree with the articles that say that the pastor’s role is intended as the man’s role as outlined in the New Testament in the true biblical sense.

  6. Karen Keil
    March 12th, 2012 at 04:54 | #8

    Oops…miscopied 1 Cor 7:35 by writing “undivided attention” instead of the actual text “undivided devotion”.

Comments are closed.